10 tips for moving on in your recovery

This article was written for The Accidental Hipster, our 50th birthday magazine

It’s that same feeling you get when you're about to jump off the top diving board for the first time.

The long walk up, gripping every bar tightly, feeling your heart pump harder and faster with each climbing breath, when someone say it’s time to move on, to move out from what you know and understand.

From a place of recovery into a world which likes to self medicate.

"To hear the words “It’s time to move” is the same overwhelming feeling of terror that you can have on top of the diving board."

To hear the words “It’s time to move” is the same overwhelming feeling of terror that you can have on top of the diving board.

Thankfully, at the progression department we understand that feeling of terror, mixed with a sense of excitement, that comes with things finally moving forward.

The SCT progression department works with students of the New Hanbury Project to help them into our social enterprises, such as Paper and Cup and Restoration Station, as well as other placements. jobs and volunteer opportunities.

But more than this, we understand that change takes time, and that recovery from drugs and alcohol always comes first.

"But more than this, we understand that change takes time, and that recovery from drugs and alcohol always comes first."

Our aim is to give people the means to walk through what can be the most difficult and stressful times of their recovery – change and employment.

Here are our top tips for when you are facing change:  
 

10 top tips for surviving change

  1. Don’t move to fast too quickly, change takes time
     
  2. Allow yourself space to process thought and feelings- for some, the return of feelings is a new thing, so you might not truly know what is going on, until you have the space to explore it
     
  3. Share your fears and worries- you will get a lot of comfort hearing from others who have been through the same experiences
     
  4. Don’t let your recovery practices slip. Without recovery you’ll miss out on all the other good things that come with it.
     
  5. Try not to isolate, getting out of your comfort zone can drive you to retreat into what makes you feel safe, but it could turn out to be a step backwards
     
  6. Small steps add up. You might not get the first job or placement, but a small step in the right direction will add up in the long run
     
  7. Be patient
     
  8. Be patient some more
     
  9. Breathe- Along with exercise, healthy eating and sleep will help to balance out the fear endorphins which tire your body out.
     
  10. Be thankful, when things get tough think of the small things. What can seem impossible is possible with the right attitude. 

Read how we help people in recovery gain work experience

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