Rehab demystified

I think my friend is an alcoholic, what should I do? If you've ever asked that question, read on

Did you know that some of SCT's staff are in long-term recovery themselves. We're often told that our 'pathway to recovery' works because our staff know what people are going through.

People can't say “You have no idea what it’s like”. Because they do. They’ve lived it.

We find that if people don’t get back into planned activity such as work or volunteering soon after their first stage of recovery, relapse becomes a bigger threat.

The article below was written by Donna, Ray and Johnny, keyworkers at our residential recovery accommodation, Acorn House in Shoreditc‬h.

Here they demystify recovery and you can find the full article in the Accidental Hipster:

I think my friend is an alcoholic, what should I do?

Ask them if they want help. If they don’t, it will be very difficult to do anything, and this can be hard on you and the people in their lives.

As a first step, you could contact Alcoholics Anonymous who have some questionnaires and information pamphlets, which may be helpful if your friend is willing to have a read.

I want to go into rehab, what’s it like? How will I be treated?

Our experience is that it’s perfectly ok. You will be treated with respect and taught how to remain clean and sober.

Our focus is on supporting a resident’s progression by helping them to find work, training or education.

Every rehab is different and you will need to do some research to find out which is most suitable for you. Each place has its own approach to recovery, fee structure and way of running things.

Some are funded by the local authority, so residents don't pay directly, others are privately run.

Some like Acorn House — SCT’s residential recovery acommodation for homeless men in Shoreditch — are funded through the housing benefit system.

Most programmes last around 12 weeks. A key consideration when choosing your rehab is to ask about after-care provision.

You are going to have to be willing to be taught how to live life in a different way by people that have been through it.

We find that if people don’t get back into planned activity such as work or volunteering soon after their first stage of recovery, relapse becomes a bigger threat.

Our focus is on supporting a resident’s progression by helping them to find work, training or education.

What are the common challenges in early recovery? How can I address them?

By learning how to live life and deal with everything that it brings (good and bad), without using drink or drugs to get through it or enjoy it.

This includes staying away from old friends and old haunts. You can start addressing these challenges by going to AA meetings and speaking to people that have had to do the same thing.

You are going to have to be willing to be taught how to live life in a different way by people that have been through it.

If you’re trying to stay clean and sober, where can you go out in Shoreditch?

SCT’s recovery community has the answer.

Mondays: Film club
Wednesdays: Choices café
Fridays: Choices ‘social’

Find out more on the Choices website or on the Choices facebook page

Read more about how we help to prevent relapse

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